• Child and Adolescent Safety Education (C.A.S.E.) Programs

Child Safety Education Program (CSEP) © 

Campers, “Let’s Be Safe Together!”

Ages 5 to 7 years

Course Rationale

In 2004 we began our Child Safety Education Program.  This program provides age-appropriate information to summer-camp children (ages 5 to 7) based on six rules of child safety.  In the classes, children learn basic rules they can follow to help keep themselves safe from others in potentially dangerous situations.

Course Description

The two largest lures used in child abductions in the United States remain asking a child for assistance in finding a pet and posing as a family friend offering a ride home.  ACIM’s Child Safety Education Program provides age appropriate information to summer camp children based on six rules of child safety, including: the buddy system, having a secret code word, saying “no” with authority, and avoiding the most common lures used by abductors.  The information is presented in the form of theory, video presentation and role playing, and is reinforced with handouts such as safety coloring books and book marks.  A Child Is Missing conducts prevention training sessions to equip teachers with the program material and scripts that have been specifically crafted to accompany the video presentation to the children.  School teachers from each local area conduct these presentations.

Learning Objectives

a.      Define safety and danger.

b.      Distinguish between a safe and unsafe person.

c.       Teach the importance of a “secret code word” and who should know it.

d.      Teach when and how to say “NO!” authoritatively.

e.      Develop an understanding of the “safety zone” (personal space).

f.        Teach the importance of and when to use the “buddy system.”

 

Positive Attitude Wins I – Anti-Bullying Program©

Ages 8 to 10 years

Course Rationale

Why we teach our Positive Attitude Wins I – Anti-Bullying Program to children as early as possible…

      Bullying occurs in school playgrounds every 7 minutes and once every 25 minutes in class.

  • Boys report more physical forms of bullying; girls tend to bully in indirect ways, such as gossiping and excluding.
  • Boys who bully are physically stronger and have a need to dominate others.
  • Girls who bully tend to be physically weaker than other girls in their class.
  • Bullies have little empathy for their victims and show little remorse about bullying.
  • Boys and girls are equally likely to report being bullied.
  • Research has not supported the popular stereotype that victims have unusual physical traits.
  • 85% of bullying episodes occur in the context of a peer group.
  • 83% of students indicate that watching bullying makes them feel uncomfortable.
  • Bullying stops in less than 10 seconds 57% of the time when peers intervene on behalf of the victim.
  • In playground observations, peers intervened in 11% of the bullying episodes, while teachers only intervened in 4% of bullying episodes.
  • Bullies often come from homes that are neglectful, hostile, and use harsh punishment.
  • Bullying is  a learned behavior 
  • Bullying occurs in school playgrounds every 7 minutes and once every 25 minutes in class.

Course Description

Positive Attitude Wins I – Anti-Bullying Program

The power of Positive Attitude Wins Program is an integral part of our child safety program and deals with bullying in various forms…Physical, Emotional, Mental and Cyber Bullying. We talk about being an Up-Stander rather than a By-Stander.  Children discuss instances when they have seen bullying or been a part of bullying; and, by talking to others they begin to understand that everyone experiences bullying on some level.  It is what a person decides to do about it that makes a difference.  We also introduce the topic of positive attitude in their everyday life and how important it is to deal with bullying when it takes place.  We explore with the children what the words Positive Attitude mean for them in regards to bullying.  Children are reassured by the stories they share and by our teachers.  They realize that they are not alone and that only by resolution can they avoid conflict. 

Learning Objectives

1.       Provide children with an understandable definition of Positive Attitude and its power.

2.       Provide children with an understandable definition of what bullying is.

*Physical

*Verbal

*Emotional

*Cyber

3.       Provide children with an understandable definition of a bully.

4.       Provide children with an understandable definition of a person who is bullied.

5.       Provide children with an understandable definition of a By-stander.

6.       Provide children with an understandable definition of an Up-stander.

7.       Provide children with non-aggressive ways to deal with being bullied.

8.       Teach children ways they can help someone else who is being bullied.

9.       Teach children how to solve a bullying problem without violence.

 

 Positive Attitude Wins II – Internet Safety Program©

(Educating, Engaging and Empowering Youth to be Safer on the Internet)

Ages 11 to 14 years

Course Rationale

Today the Internet is used for many activities.  Some activities are positive, and others less than positive and sometimes harmful.  Youth face very serious risks online, such as online predators, cyberbullying and the consequences of making inappropriate choices by disclosing far too much information about themselves.  An intrinsic part of safeguarding youth online is teaching them about the risks they face and how to make responsible choices and decisions.  

Course Description

For children eleven and older, a mature, age-appropriate approach is taken to discussing internet safety and the risks they face online.  The class size is purposely smaller for an open discussion in the class, rather than a presentation.  Using current videos about Internet Victimization, the teacher delves deeper into the theme of “choices and consequences” and expands the discussion to include the repercussions of not being a responsible online communicator/user.      The smaller class size makes them comfortable to discuss problems they have had or seen and the video clips help the teacher touch their audience logically as well as emotionally.  The interaction of the youth is the primary focus in the class, and the teachers engage the class to speak out.  With no preset script, the course engages the class to open lines of communication, discussing boundaries, betrayals, and current events regarding online communication, as well as reinforces the reality and proximity of online risks and dangers.

Learning Objectives

a.      Educate youth on how to recognize Potential Internet Risks.

b.      Engage youth in a two-way conversation about Online Risks.

c.       Empower youth to help Prevent Themselves from Being Exploited Online.

d.      Develop and Understanding of the Need to Report Victimization to and Adult.

e.      Enhance and Support Child and Adolescent Safety Education Efforts in the Community.

 

 The Anatomy of a Murder of a Bully©

 Course Rationale

Broward County resources for youth, in particular Vulnerable, High Risk Youth, are often scarce and many traditional service organizations lack the training, sensitivity and expertise to adequately recognize and address the issues of communication and relationship building with this population.

Therefore, young members of the Community, who have difficulty in expressing themselves clearly when trying to impart information, often react, sometimes violently, rather than respond to people and situations when trying to share their ideas and feelings; and, they are often fearful of communicating their needs.  It is our contention that Bullying, one of the most dangerous issues faced by youth today, is a result of the inability to communicate effectively.

This course will help dispel the myths surrounding the bully and the act of bullying.  It is our hope that acceptance, inclusiveness and compassion will replace rejection, segregation and disdain among our community’s youth.  Only through education can open dialogue begin and violence, in the form of bullying, end.  It is anticipated that this dialogue will lead to open communication among the Youth; and, the development of Youth-to-Youth Mentoring Groups within the various schools, centers and residences of Broward County will ensue.   

There are few other proactive, educational programs, specifically programs dealing with how communication is related to the issue of bullying, offered for our target population, ages 11 through 17.  A model of cooperation, mutual respect and reconciliation will be used.

Course Description

Through lecture, DVD presentation, and interactive input and participation by attendees, this ten (10) hour course provides an overview of the how and why youth are at high risk for being bullied, or at the very least misunderstood, and sometimes exploited and abused; how simple, yet complex, it is to become a bully; and, how effective communication skills can diminish the likelihood of bullying taking place.

Through the viewing and examination of the History Channel documentary called Payback for a Bully, the participants will observe and experience bullying which results in violence carried to the extreme.  They will be asked to “get into the head” of each of the “Broward Seven,” making different choices than those that were portrayed in the documentary, which will perhaps lead to different consequences.

Through examination of the physical, mental, psychological and social/cultural aspects of communication, participants will receive insight into the communication patterns they use, as well as the communication patterns used by others.  Techniques and Tools for increasing

Communication Skills will be discussed and used, so that participants can better know and understand how to communicate more effectively and skillfully manage their lives, in potentially dangerous or disruptive situations

Learning Objectives

1.       Define and Explore the Bully and Bullying – Who is the Bully?

2.       Define and Explore Abuse, Exploitation, Manipulation and Violence in Youth.

3.       Define and Explore Choices and Consequences.

4.       Define and Explore Communication – Who, What When, Where and Why Do We Communicate the Way We Do?  What is Effective Communication?

5.       Define and Explore Howe We Communicate – Explore the Physical, Mental, Emotional and Cultural Levels of Communication.

6.       Explore Perception as It Relates to Communication.

7.       Explore How Our Response(s) to How Others Communicate Results in How We Communicate – Enhance Understanding of Reaction and Response.

8.       Define, Explain and Explore How Our Choices and How We Communicate Those Choices Impact on Who We Are & How We Are Perceived By Others.

9.       Explore Ways of Expression that are Clear, Concise and Assertive – Introduce and Explore the “Four C’s” of Communication and Define Each Style – Commanding, Contact, Consistent and Concise.

 

"Express Yourself!” – A Course in Effective Communication©

 Course Rationale

The Oxford American dictionary describes communication as:  the imparting or exchanging of information or news; the successful conveying or sharing of ideas and feelings.

As a result of this course, Vulnerable, High Risk Populations (abused, battered and/or exploited youth, women and men), who have difficulty in expressing themselves clearly when trying to impart information, who often react rather than respond to people and situations when trying to share their ideas and feelings, and who are fearful of communicating their needs, will gain self-understanding in order to improve and increase interpersonal relationship effectiveness.

Recently, in a national survey by the U. S. Census Bureau on hiring, training and management practices in business, employers ranked attitude, which included communication skills, right along with motivation and commitment, ahead of aptitude, or technical skills as the number one training concern in business today!

The one constant in all our lives is change. As these vulnerable, high risk populations go out into the world and experience additional schooling, or enter the workplace, they will find themselves in diverse, down-sized, re-engineered, team-oriented situations that will require flexibility and exceptional communication skills.

Course Description

Through lecture, video presentation, and interactive input and participation by attendees, this ten-hour course provides an overview of the how and why they are at high risk for being misunderstood, and sometimes exploited and abused, due to their inability to clearly convey what they are thinking and/or feeling. 

Through examination of the physical, psychological and social aspects of communication, participants will receive insight into the communication patterns they use, as well as the communication patterns used by others.  Techniques and Tools for increasing communication skills will be discussed and used, so that participants can better know and understand how to communicate more effectively and more skillfully manage their lives in our fast-paced, changing world.

Learning Objectives

Define and Explore Communication – Who, What When, Where and Why Do We Communicate the Way We Do?  What is Effective Communication?

  1. Define and Explore the Levels of Communication – Physical, Mental, Emotional and Cultural
  2. Define and Explore Personal Exploitation and/or Abuse, as It Relates to Communication
  3. Explore Perception as It Relates to Communication
  4. Explore How Our Response(s) to How Others Communicate Results in How We Communicate – Enhance Understanding of Victim Reaction and Response
  5. Define, Explain and Explore How Our Choices and How We Communicate Those Choices Impact on Who We Are & How We Are Perceived By Others
  6. Explore Long Term Benefits and Repercussions Associated with the  Use of Internet Communication – Social Networking Sites
  7. Explore Ways of Expression that are Clear, Concise and Assertive – Define the “Four C’s” of Communication 

 

“It Can’t Happen to Me!” Sexual Predator Educational Awareness Program ©

(A Program about Child Sexual Abuse and the Sexual Predator)

Ages 14 to 17

(Also Presented to Parents, Teachers and Other Adults)

 Program Rationale

The Sexual Predator Educational Awareness Program was conceptualized and developed as a result of years of working with Law Enforcement and focusing on the safety of children.  A Child Is Missing, Inc. (ACIM) recognized that adults often did not know how to respond to children’s issues as a direct result of not understanding the issue.  This was particularly true of child sexual abuse and the sexual predator.  In February 2008 and January 2009 respectively, with the production and premier of our two educational docudramas, “It Can’t Happen To Me!” I and II, ACIM brought together five true-to-life scenarios about the sexual predator based on actual cases in which A Child Is Missing had been involved.  These docudramas deliver an abundance of preventative information for Law Enforcement and the general public alike.  Our presenters include not only Law Enforcement professionals who have investigated sex crimes against children, but also victims of childhood sexual abuse and educators.  This diverse expanse of presenters and perspectives has gone a long way in bridging the gap in awareness and understanding in the audiences to which we present.

Everyday relatives and neighbors visit you in your home, you pass strangers on the street, and the computer brings both familiar and unfamiliar people into your home and work place.  What drove A Child Is Missing (ACIM) to want to educate adults about the potential threat all of these individuals might present to children?  Why did we feel the need to help adults understand that alerting children to stranger danger alone is not enough?  How could we make them aware that harm is most often done to children by people who are not strangers to them?  How could we teach them what to look for in strangers, relatives, neighbors, teachers or anyone who might present a threat to their children? 

Our presenters include not only Law Enforcement professionals who have investigated sex crimes against children, but also victims of childhood sexual abuse and educators.  This diverse expanse of presenters and perspectives, coupled with the powerful and thought provoking docudramas, has gone a long way in bridging the gap in awareness and understanding in the audiences to which we present.

Program Description

…“It can’t happen in my neighborhood…I live in a safe community...our schools are safe…I know kids are safe here”…

It can happen in your neighborhood…it can happen to children who attend your schools…children are not safe.

As adults, educating ourselves about those who prey upon and abuse our children is the first and most important step we can take to protect our children and ensure a healthy and happy future for them.  As adults we are responsible for the safety of our children.  We need to LEARN THE FACTS ABOUT CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE and UNDERSTAND THE RISKS, in order to prevent, recognize and react responsibly to it.

Three Important Facts:

·         Childhood Sexual Abuse Happens More Often Than You Think.

·         Children Usually Know The Molesters Who Prey Upon Them.

·         Most Children Do Not Tell Anyone What Has Happened To Them.

 Learning Objective

A Child Is Missing, Inc., through presentation of our two-part, educational docudrama series, “It Can’t Happen To Me!” helps answer questions youth and adults might have about how to recognize Child Sexual Abuse and the Sexual Predator.

 

 

 

 
 

It all started when…

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